3000+ Attendees, 450 Speakers, 12 Conference Tracks, 100+ Posters
 
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2013 Archived Content
Fourth Annual

Personalized Diagnostics

Getting Ready for Clinical Use

 

Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | View TRICON Attendees 

Successfully moving NGS to the clinic will require a multidisciplinary approach and the climate for reimbursement will affect the adoption of new technologies. The fourth annual Personalized Diagnostics conference will address common challenges such as cumbersome and variable sample prep, rapidly changing technology, limitations of instruments, inadequate data quality, and complex and non-standardized data interpretation in the clinical setting.

Scientific Advisory Board

German Pihan, M.D., Director, Hematopathology Lab, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School
Karl Voelkerding, M.D., Associate Professor, Pathology, University of Utah; Medical Director, Advanced Technology and Bioinformatics, ARUP Laboratories


 

Wednesday, February 13

7:00 am Registration and Morning Coffee

 

Plenary Keynote Session 

8:00 – 9:40 am Plenary Keynote Presentation - Personalized Oncology – Fulfilling the Promise for Today's Patients

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference, CHI and Cancer Commons will present a plenary panel on Personalized Oncology. Innovations such as NGS and The Cancer Genome Atlas have revealed that cancer comprises hundreds of distinct molecular diseases. Early clinical successes with targeted therapies suggest that cancer might one day be managed as a chronic disease using an evolving cocktail of drugs.Representing all five conference channels, Diagnostics, Therapeutics, Clinical, Informatics, and Cancer, a panel of experts will lead a highly interactive exploration of what it will take to realize this vision in the near future.

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9:40 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

 

Keynote Session 

11:00 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

11:10 Investing in Molecular Diagnostics

Sue E. Siegel, Corporate Officer and CEO, healthymagination, GE

11:40 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION IN HONOR OF DR. JEFFREY KANT, Former Chair, AMP Economic Affairs Committee“May You Live in Interesting Times:” The Evolving Landscape of CPT Coding for Molecular Testing

Roger Klein, M.D., J.D., Department of Molecular Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation

2013 will herald broad implementation of more transparent CPT coding for higher volume molecular pathology tests in the oncology and genetics arenas.  A number of salient issues to include fee schedule placement and valuation of new molecular pathology CPT codes should be at least partially resolved.  Advancements in new technologies such as next generation sequencing of gene panels, exomes and even full genomes pose new challenges for transparent and rational coding for labs and payers.  This presentation will update and review developments on these and other topics of current interest.

Dr. Jeff Kant was a dedicated College of American Pathologists member and was the Vice Chair of Scientific Affairs Council, a member of the CAP Economic Affairs Committee, the Personalized Health Committee, and the Next Generation Sequencing Work group.  He was also a member of the AMA Molecular Pathology CPT WorkGroup; And the Chair of the AMP Economic Affairs Committee.

 

Regulatory Update 

12:05 Chairperson’s Remarks

Toumy Guettouche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, Dr. John T. MacDonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics; Director, Genome Technology Assessment and Implementation, Center for Genome Technology; Director, Oncogenomics Core Facility, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, School of Medicine

12:10 pm Microarray/Next-Generation Sequencing Quality Control Project

Leming Shi, Ph.D., National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration

 

Life_Technologies 12:40 Luncheon Presentation I
CDx Development-Are you ready? Key considerations for Rx/Dx Co-Development from the Dx Partner Perspective
Todd Krueger, Strategy Leader, Medical Sciences, Life TechnologiesSuccessful co-development of CDx products requires many decisions be made long before development begins.  Key considerations from the IVD development partner perspective will be explored including locking down the marker set, choosing the right platforms and reagents, when to move from RUO to IUO, what is proper commercialization strategy to match the needs of the drug. 

1:10 Luncheon Presentation II (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Lunch on Your Own

1:45 20th Anniversary Cake in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

 

Getting Personalized Diagnostics Ready for Clinical Use 

2:15 Chairperson’s Remarks

Toumy Guettouche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, Dr. John T. MacDonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics; Director, Genome Technology Assessment and Implementation, Center for Genome Technology; Director, Oncogenomics Core Facility, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, School of Medicine

2:20 Implementation of Deep (Next-Gen) Sequencing in a Clinical Lab

Toumy Guettouche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, Dr. John T. MacDonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics; Director, Genome Technology Assessment and Implementation, Center for Genome Technology; Director, Oncogenomics Core Facility, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, School of Medicine

The presentation will cover the implementation of deep (next-gen) sequencing in a clinical lab. This includes sample preparation and quality control from different types of starting material (e.g. dried blood spot and formalin fixed paraffin embedded samples) and workflow examples using different types of targeted panels.

2:50 Quality Control Parameters and Software Tools to Enable Clinical Sequencing on High-Performance Sequencing Platforms

Shawn Levy, Ph.D., Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

This presentation details the use of advanced sample registration and identification capabilities as well as rapid sample contamination screens using inexpensive sequecing tools.  Additionally, software tools to complement existing instrument control software to improve instrument reliability and communication will be described. 

3:20 Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing: From DNA to Diagnosis in 50 Hours

Darrell Dinwiddie, Ph.D., Director, Lab Operations, Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine, Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics

Disease progression in newborns is often fast and heterogeneous, so molecular diagnosis must occur rapidly for relevant clinical decision making. Here, we describe 50-hour differential diagnosis of genetic disorders by whole genome sequencing (WGS), featuring substantially automated bioinformatic analysis.

Genia3:50 Solving the Challenges of DNA Sequencing for Molecular Diagnostics

Stefan Roever, CEO & Founder, Genia Technologies

There is no debate that genetic information is needed to truly realize the promise of personalized medicine.The problem is that today’s DNA sequencers cost anywhere from $50K - $1M, rely on complicated optics, and utilize a complex workflow that does not lend itself to clinical utility.

4:20 Networking Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Sponsorship Opportunities Available)

5:20 Breakout Discussions in the Exhibit Hall

Opportunities to Develop CDx Tests via the Life Technologies Companion Dx Partnership Program

Moderators: Thomas McElroy, Director, Companion Diagnostics, Life Technologies 

Todd Krueger, Head, Molecular Medicine Business Development, Life Technologies

Bioinformatics Challenges for Clinical Genome Sequencing

Moderator: Stuart Brown, Professor of Bioinformatics, New York University

Clinical Genome Interpretation

Moderator: Shawn Levy, Ph.D., Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

FFPE Samples and NGS

Moderator: Toumy Guettouche, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, Dr. John T. MacDonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics; Director, Genome Technology Assessment and Implementation, Center for Genome Technology; Director, Oncogenomics Core Facility, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, School of Medicine

Leveraging TCGA and NGS data for Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Clinical Population Selection

Moderators: Emma Bowden, Director of Translational Medicine, Compendia Bioscience a Life Technologies company Matt Anstett, Market Development Manager, Compendia Bioscience a Life Technologies company

6:20 Close of Day

 

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  2015 Plenary Sessions 


2015 MMTC Prelim Agenda 

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