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RNA-Seq Experimental Design and Bioinformatics

Genetic Privacy: Technology and Ethics

Microbes and Human Health: The What, Where, How and Why 



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Sequencing Strategies for Success Conference - Day 1




As prices continue to drop and technology continues to improve, the purchase of a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform is now a reality for most research laboratories. Once you have purchased a platform, however, how do you maximize the greatest potential for your investment? Realizing this potential requires efficient workflow strategies, careful experimental design, comprehensive targeted enrichment technologies, data analysis, management and integration, in addition to maintaining your platform and people management all at maximum production. The central theme at CHI's Sequencing Strategies for Success conference is efficient utilization of your NGS platform. Sessions will focus on common bottlenecks, case studies, real-world experiences and solutions from experienced NGS users.

Day 1 | Day 2 

Monday, August 19

8:30 am Short Course Registration and Morning Coffee

9:00-12:00 pm Short Courses*

SC1: Mapping Genomes in 3D
SC2: Sample Prep 

* Separate Registration Required

1:00 Main Conference Registration

 

Sequencing Centers 

2:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

Lisa D. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine

2:10 Sequencing: Wonderful Adventure or Terrible Tragedy? 

Lisa-White  

Lisa D. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine  Biography 

Applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) to clinical diagnostics promises to increase the rate of diagnoses, and as more correlations with phenotype are drawn, there is the promise of biomarker detection for prognosis and therapeutics. Taking NGS to the next step from a basic research procedure in a non-certified molecular lab to providing clinical sequencing requires a host of different procedures and a different laboratory culture than that found in basic research. The experience of launching NGS in a laboratory can run the gamut of wonderful adventure to terrible tragedy depending on preparedness, resources and support. This talk will cover some of the issues required to make the transition into an NGS CLIA-/CAP-certified laboratory.


 

 

2:40 Translational Science: From Basic Research to Genomic Medicine in an Academic Core Laboratory – Lessons Learned

Nicholas-AmbulosNicholas P. Ambulos, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Microbiology and Immunology; Executive Director, School of Medicine Core Facilities; Director, Genomics Core Facility, University of Maryland School of Medicine  Biography 

Next-generation sequencing technology continues to improve and become more cost-effective. Academic core laboratories have played a significant role in making this technology readily available to basic research laboratories. As a result, this technology is rapidly becoming the diagnostic tool of choice for many clinicians. The challenge we now face is how these academic core laboratories can provide comprehensive support to basic research, translational studies and clinical diagnostics and play a role in educating healthcare professionals.

3:10 An Overview of the New York Genome Center

Kevin-ShiannaKevin V. Shianna, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Sequencing Operations, New York Genome Center  Biography 

The NYGC initiated its sequencing operations in early 2012 and is building out to be one of the largest genome centers in North America. An overview of our experience to date will be presented along with future goals and challenges.

3:40 Refreshment Break

4:00 Combining Forces: Using All NGS Platforms to Advance Cancer Research at CGR

Joseph-BolandJoseph Boland, Director, Research and Development, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health  Biography  

With the continual reduction in instrument costs and comparable quality metrics, the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory (CGR) has put in place a combined approach to cancer research utilizing our Ion Proton/PGMs in conjunction with our Illumina HiSeqs/Miseqs. Our presentation will highlight comparative experiments between Illumina and Life instruments, the current wet-lab processes using this combined approach—such as our combined exome, exome follow-up and transcriptome pipelines—and how we see this impacting our future research.

4:30 From Genome Technology to Genome Biology

Yijun RuanYijun Ruan, Ph.D., Professor and Director for Genome Sciences, Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, The Jackson Laboratory  Biography 

At the Jackson Laboratory, we have developed a dynamic genomics program with a focus on genomic technologies based on paired-end-tag (PET) sequencing, which has broad applications in various genome biology questions including RNA-PET for transcriptome, DNA-PET for genome structural variation and de novo genome sequence assembling, and ChIP-PET and ChIA-PET for genome regulation. We are applying the PET sequencing approaches for studies of transcription regulatory mechanisms in human and mouse genomes, identification of genetic variations and fusion genes in patient-specific cancer genomes and characterization of new genomes from a wide range of organisms including bacteria, animals and plants. Our recent studies of identifying patient-specific genomic variations, 3D mapping of the promoter interactions in human genomes and de novo assembling of plant genomes will be highlighted.

5:00 Panel Discussion with Afternoon Speakers 

Moderator: Lisa D. White, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine

While next-generation sequencing platforms are increasingly affordable and enormously useful for research laboratories and for understanding the basis of disease diagnosis, thoughtful strategies are necessary to maximize their benefits. In this panel discussion, representatives from nationwide sequencing centers share their processes, research needs, challenges and goals in using NGS technologies.

Panelists:

Nicholas P. Ambulos, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Microbiology and Immunology; Executive Director, School of Medicine Core Facilities; Director, Genomics Core Facility, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Kevin V. Shianna, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Sequencing Operations, New York Genome Center

Joseph Boland, Director, Research and Development, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health

Yijun Ruan, Ph.D., Professor and Director for Genome Sciences, Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, The Jackson Laboratory

5:45 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall

6:45 Close of Day

 

Day 1 | Day 2 



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