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RNA-Seq Experimental Design and Bioinformatics

Genetic Privacy: Technology and Ethics

Microbes and Human Health: The What, Where, How and Why 



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Dynamics of the Microbiome on Health and Disease Conference - Day 1


Conference Proceeding CD Now Available
  • Speaker Presentations
  • Poster Abstracts
  • and More!


Advances in next-generation sequencing and computation have elucidated the impact of human genomic variation; however, the impact of this variation is largely unexplored in the human microbiome. Now clinical and environmental researchers have the high-resolution tools to explore the emergent science of microbial communities and the ecosystems they inhabit. CHI’s Dynamics of the Microbiome on Health and Disease conference focuses on understanding the role of the microbiome to offer new insights into disease processes and discovery of new therapeutic strategies.

Day 1 | Day 2 

Monday, August 19

8:30 am Short Course Registration and Morning Coffee

9:00-12:00 pm Short Courses*

SC1: Mapping Genomes in 3D
SC2: Sample Prep 

* Separate Registration Required

1:00 Main Conference Registration

 

Communities and Composition 

2:00 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph

 

» Featured Presentation

2:10 Metagenomic Platforms for Diagnostic, Microbial Composition and Etiologic Agent Discovery Applications

Joseph Petrosino, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Molecular Virology and Microbiology; Director, Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine

Metagenomics strategies for etiologic agent discovery and diagnostic detection have multiple advantages over past methods: they are highly sensitive; they are able to detect sub-PFU levels of viruses in clinical samples; there is no requirement for propagation of the suspected agent in the laboratory; and there is no need for prior knowledge of the agent to be detected. For suspected bacterial agents we are using 16S rRNA gene and whole-genome shotgun surveys of diverse human samples to identify potential agents and antibiotic resistance profiles. For suspected viral agents we are sequencing randomly primed cDNA libraries and querying these data against a custom viral database. Our results show several new potential bacterial agents that may be associated with different diseases with unknown etiologies. We are currently in the process of translating these methods to the clinic where these approaches can immediately impact human health.

2:40 Archaea and Fungi of the Human Gut Microbiome

Christian Hoffmann, Research Scientist, Frederic D. Bushman Laboratory, Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania  Biography 

We investigate associations of diet with fungal and archaeal populations in the gut microbiome, as well as interdomain relationships between bacteria, archaea and fungi in a cohort of 96 individuals. Diet relationships with microbial taxa were investigated regarding usual and recent dietary intake.

3:10 Microbial Ecosystems Therapeutics: A New Paradigm in Medicine?

Emma-Allen-VercoeEmma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph  Biography 

It is now clearly recognized that the human gut microbial ecosystem is a critical factor in the maintenance of host health, and that disturbances in this ecosystem, leading to enduring imbalance (dysbiosis) are associated with an ever increasing number of disorders (for example, IBD, IBS, diabetes, asthma, autism). With this in mind, is it possible to harness the microbial ecosystems of supremely healthy individuals to correct gut dysbiosis in diseased individuals? I will present the “brave new future” of microbial ecosystem therapeutics and outline the questions that need to be considered before the practice can be put into mainstream use.

PodcastMicrobes and Human Health: The What, Where, How and Why with Emma Allen-Vercoe 

3:40 Refreshment Break

4:00 Studying the Human Microbiome with Citizen Science

Gabriel Foster, Vice President, Lab Operations, uBiome

uBiome is a citizen science startup that uses next-generation sequencing to examine the microbial ecology in humans. We crowdfunded our startup and will involve the public in asking and answering questions about the human microbiome.


4:30 An Active Subset of the Human Gut Microbiota Responsive to Xenobiotics

Corinne-MauriceCorinne Maurice, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Peter J. Turnbaugh Laboratory, FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University  

The human gut contains trillions of microbes that can influence the efficacy and toxicity of therapeutic drugs, including antibiotics. However, the identity of the metabolically active cells and their responsiveness to drug exposure remains unclear. Here, we identify the Firmicutes as the active cells of the gut microbiota, rapidly affected by host-targeted drugs and antibiotics. Xenobiotics exposure increased cell damage and induced the expression antibiotic resistance, drug metabolism and stress response genes. This study highlights the many unintended consequences of therapeutics on the activity of our resident gut microbes.

5:00 Panel Discussion with Afternoon Speakers 

Moderator: Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph

Despite its thriving presence within us, we are only starting to understand the human microbiome and its links to individual health. There remains much to explore as we apply NGS technology to examinations of the human microbiome, translate research to the clinic and recognize both the effect of gut microbes on various disorders and the reverse impact of our own diet and therapeutics on them. This expert panel shares academic and business perspectives on studying and applying findings about these apparently two-way connections.

Panelists:

Joseph Petrosino, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Molecular Virology and Microbiology; Director, Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine

Christian Hoffmann, Research Scientist, Frederic D. Bushman Laboratory, Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Gabriel Foster, Vice President, Lab Operations, uBiome

Corinne Maurice, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Peter J. Turnbaugh Laboratory, FAS Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University

5:45 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall

6:45 Close of Day

 

Day 1 | Day 2 



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