PEGS-The Chain Episode 17

In the fight against Coronavirus, there have been many calls for widespread testing. Dr. Nathan Ledeboer explains the power diagnostic testing has when combatting a pandemic, and the importance for collaboration in innovation during this time.

Nathan Ledeboer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair, Pathology; Medical Director, Medical College of Wisconsin
Dr. Ledeboer received his BA Degree from Dordt College in 2000 and his PhD Degree in Microbiology from the University of Iowa in 2005. Following two years of fellowship training in clinical and public health microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, MO, he became an Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Medical College of Wisconsin and Medical Director of Clinical Microbiology and Molecular Diagnostics at Froedtert Hospital and Dynacare Laboratories in Milwaukee, WI where he has remained for more than 5 years. In addition to his service activities as director of clinical microbiology and molecular diagnostics at a large academic medical center, Dr. Ledeboer continues to develop his research career. His research endeavors, particularly in the area developing diagnostic tools for infectious diseases, have led to numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals. He has been Chairman of Public and Professional Affairs for the South Central Association for Clinical Microbiology and served on the American Society for Microbiology’s Clinical Microbiology Task Force. Dr. Ledeboer is currently a member of the American Board of Medical Microbiology Exam committee, a member of the Committee on Postgraduate Educational Programs through the American Society for Microbiology, and is the microbiology scientific program chair for The Association for Mass Spectrometry: Applications to the Clinical Laboratory. He is currently a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for numerous other journals in infectious diseases and clinical microbiology. He has delivered nearly 100 invited lectures in various medical-scientific educational forums worldwide and has served as an investigator on more than 75 funded research projects. In 2011, he received the distinguished Siemens Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Microbiology.